Brendan Taylor Guns Down Competition in Limit Hold’em Shootout
 
Taylor Wins WSOP Gold Bracelet in Event 53
 
Latest WSOP Winner Collects $184,950 in Prize Money
 
Poker Friends Play Heads Up in Latest WSOP Duel
 
Through 53 WSOP Events -- WSOP Attendance Increases 18 Percent from Last Year
 
For the tournament portal page for this event, click HERE.

OVERVIEW

Brendan Taylor was the winner of the $1,500 buy-in Limit Hold’em Shootout championship at the 2010 World Series of Poker.  This marked his first career WSOP gold bracelet victory.  Taylor, who is originally from Pasadena, CA and now resides in Las Vegas, collected $184,950 in prize money in what was his sixth time to cash at the WSOP.  Taylor’s most notable previous achievement was a fifth-place finish in an event here two years ago.

The runner up was Ben Yu, a poker pro from Henderson, NV.  He received $114,484.

Incredibly, the top two finishers are fellow poker players who share the same house in Las Vegas.  Taylor and Yu live in a home with four professional poker players.  When this tournament still had 30 players remaining, the two friends joked that it would be fun to play heads-up.  Truth is sometimes stranger than fiction, and that’s exactly what happened as Taylor ended up taking the bragging rights and the gold bracelet.

This year’s Limit Hold’em Shootout attracted 548 entries.  The total prize pool was $739,800.  The top 64 finishers collected prize money.  Former WSOP gold bracelet finishers who cashed in this event included – Chau Giang, Jeff Ahmadi, Jimmy Shultz, and Tomas Alenius.  

Pat Pezzin cashed for the seventh time this year, which is one cash behind the 2010 leader – Allen “Chainsaw” Kessler.

THE CHAMPION – BRENDAN TAYLOR

The $1,500 buy-in Limit Hold’em Shootout champion (Event #53) is Brendan Taylor.

He is a 30-year-old professional poker player.

Taylor grew up in Pasadena, CA.

Taylor now lives in Las Vegas.  He shares a home with three other professional poker players.

Taylor attended Emory College in Atlanta.

Taylor’s passion, aside from poker, is cooking.  He is a graduate of the renowned Culinary Institute of America (C.I.A.).

Taylor worked as a chef at Bayone’s, in New Orleans.  He hopes to win enough money playing poker to eventually open up his own restaurant.

Taylor’s first year to attend the WSOP was 2005.

This was Taylor’s third time to make it to a final table.  He finished third and fourth in the previous two final table appearances.

Taylor collected $184,950 for first place.  He was presented with his first WSOP gold bracelet.

According to official records, Taylor now has one win, three final table appearances, and six cashes at the WSOP.  His career WSOP earnings now total $381,848.

WINNER QUOTES

On winning his first WSOP gold bracelet:  “When I came out here in 2005, I told myself ‘I am going to win a gold bracelet this year.’  My goal was to win a limit event.  Of course, I didn’t do it that year.  I didn’t do it the next, and the next, and the next (laughing).  Two years ago, we got down to four-handed and I had an average chip stack and I think I was the best player at the table.  And, sure enough I was the next player out within 10 hands.  So, this is a great feeling.”

On how he became a full-time poker player:  “I was working and started making more money doing this.  So, I planned to take a year off and then go back to cooking, but this worked out well.”

THE FINAL TABLE

The final table included no former WSOP gold bracelet winners, guaranteeing a first-time champion.  To date, 17 of the 53 final tables played have included all maidens.

The final table began eight-handed.

The final table included players from three different nations – Canada (1 player), Holland, (1 player) and the United States (6 players).

The runner up was Ben Yu, from Las Vegas, NV.  He has now cashed three straight years at the WSOP.  This was his biggest cash, to date – paying $114,484.

The third-place finisher was Jonathan Little, from Las Vegas, NV.  This was his fifth time to cash at this year’s WSOP.  Little has accumulated more than $4 million in overall tournament winnings but has yet to achieve a breakthrough win at the WSOP.  He now has 11 WSOP cashes and enjoyed his highest finish here ever, which paid $73,218.

The fourth-place finisher was Joseph McGowan, who made his 13th career WSOP in-the-money finish in this event, which paid $48,546.

The fifth-place finisher was Brian Tate, from Tempe, AZ.  This marked his first time to cash at the WSOP, worth $33,276 in prize money.

The sixth-place finisher was Michael “Car Wash” Schneider, from Minneapolis, MN.  He has more than $400,000 in overall career tournament earnings, dating back over the last decade.  Schneider, who has five WSOP cashes and seven WSOP Circuit cashes, collected $23,563 in his first Las Vegas final table appearance.

The seventh-place finisher was Sijbrand Maal, from Amsterdam, Holland.  He won the Belgium Poker Championship in 2008.  This was Maal’s first time to cash at the WSOP, which paid $17,215.

The eighth-place finisher was Terrance Chan, from Vancouver, BC (Canada).  Chan remains snake bit as one of the game’s best players; yet he remains a non-winner.  This was Chan’s 15th time to cash at the WSOP, worth $12,961 in prize money.  Chan has now cashed six straight years at the WSOP dating back to 2005.

The final table began at 2:30 pm and ended at midnight, for a duration of about 9 1/2 hours.

OTHER IN-THE-MONEY FINISHERS

The top 64 finishers collected prize money.  Players who won their first table were guaranteed an in-the-money finish.  Former WSOP gold bracelet finishers who cashed in this event included – Chau Giang, Jeff Ahmadi, Jimmy Shultz, and Tomas Alenius.

Pat Pezzin cashed for the seventh time this year, which is now one cash behind the 2010 leader – Allen “Chainsaw” Kessler.

The defending champion was Greg Mueller, from Vancouver, BC (Canada).  He entered this year’s tournament but did not finish in-the-money.

ODDS AND ENDS

This is the 880th gold bracelet event in World Series of Poker history.  Note:  This figure includes every official WSOP event played, including tournaments during the early years when there were no actual gold bracelets awarded.  It also includes the 11 gold bracelets awarded to date at WSOP Europe.

The official WSOP gold bracelet ceremony takes place on the day following the winner’s victory (or some hours later when the tournament runs past midnight).  The ceremony takes place inside The Pavilion, which is the expansive main tournament room hosting all noon starts this year.  The ceremony begins at the conclusion of the first break of the noon tournament, usually around 2:20 pm.  The national anthem of the winner’s nation is played.  The entire presentation is open to public and media.  Video and photography are permitted by both public and members of the media.

Taylor requested that the national anthem of the United States be played at his WSOP gold bracelet ceremony, held Sunday, July 4th, 2010.

WHAT’S A SHOOTOUT?

A shootout tournament means players advance based on winning a series of table matches.  The shootout format is single elimination.  The number of matches depends on the number of tournament entries.  In this event, the winner was required to win three consecutive matches.

Each match is played like a single-table satellite, with only one winner from each table.
Day One began with 548 players.  There were 69 matches played – with an average of eight players starting at each table.

Day Two resumed with 64 players.  There were eight matches played with 8 players starting at each table.  At the end of Day Two, eight players (all the winners) advanced to Day Three, which was the final table.

Day Three resumed with eight players, which was the final table.

TOURNAMENT PLAY

The tournament was played over three consecutive days, from June 30 through July 2, 2010.

There were 548 entries.  The total prize pool amounted to $739,800.  The top 64 finishers collected prize money.

Attendance decreased slightly from last year, when there were 571 entries.

The heads-up match between Brendan Taylor and Ben Yu was ironic, given the two competitors are sharing a house in Las Vegas with a group of fellow poker players.  In fact, Taylor and Yu live in a home with four professional poker players.  When this tournament still had 30 players remaining, the two friends joked that it would be fun to play heads-up.  Truth is sometimes stranger than fiction, and that’s exactly what happened.  But Taylor ended up taking the bragging rights and the gold bracelet.

When the heads-up match began, Taylor enjoyed about a 3-to-2 chip lead over Yu.

The duel lasted only about 15 minutes.

On the final hand of the tournament, Taylor was dealt     against Ben Yu’s    .  The final board showed          , giving Taylor two pair (sevens and fours) and the victory.

Brendan Taylor is to be classified as a professional player, since he has been playing full time for about three years.

2010 WSOP STATISTICS

Tournament attendance is up significantly from this same point last year.  Last year, through 53 events, there were 49,805 entries.  Thus far this year, there have been 59,164 total entries, an increase of 18.8 percent.

Prize money is also up from last year’s figures.  Last year, through 53 events, the amount of prize money won was $102,823,303.  This year’s prize money currently stands at $107,236,265, an increase of about 4.3 percent.

Through current reporting, the nationalities of gold bracelet winners have been:

United States (35)
Great Britain (5)
Canada (5)
Hungary (2)
New Zealand (1)
France (1)
Russia (1)
Norway (1)

Through current reporting, the national origin (birthplace) of winners has been:

United States (28)
Great Britain (5)
Canada (5)
Vietnam (2)
China (2)
Hungary (2)
New Zealand (1)
France (1)
Lebanon (1)
Russia (1)
Mexico (1)
Bangladesh (1)
Norway (1)

Through current reporting, the breakdown of professional poker players to semi-pros and amateurs who won gold bracelets is as follows:

Professional Players (37):  Michael Chow, Michael Mizrachi, Praz Bansi, Josh Tieman, Peter Gelencser, James Dempsey, Men “the Master” Nguyen, Matt Matros, Yan R. Chen, Steve Gee, Carter Phillips, Jason DeWitt, Eric Buchman, David Baker, Richard Ashby, Dutch Boyd, Sammy Farha, David Warga, Will Haydon, Matt Keikoan, Mike Ellis, Luis Velador, Ayaz Mahmood, Phil Ivey, Luigi Kwaysser, Scott Montgomery, Steven Kelly, Steve Jelinek, Dean Hamrick, Ian Gordon, Gavin Smith, Jesse Rockowitz, Chris Bell, Sigurd Eskeland, Chance Kornuth, Ryan Welch, Brendan Taylor

Semi-Pros (6):  Frank Kassela, Tex Barch, Miguel Proulx, Jeffrey Papola, Frank Kassela, Mike Linn

Amateurs (8):  Duc Pham, Aadam Daya, Pascal Lefrancois, Simon Watt, Vanessa Hellebuyck, Jeff Tebben, Konstantin Puchkov, Harold Angle

Through current reporting:

Youngest Winner – Steven Kelly (21)
Oldest Winner – Harold Angle (78)
Female Winners (open events) – None
Multiple-Event Winners (this year) – Frank Kassela